Disasters: Consequences of the earthquakes, pandemics, weather shocks, and wars

Abstract


There is a consensus that disasters such as earthquakes, pandemics, weather shocks, and wars can cause considerable physical damage and human casualties. However, the socioeconomic consequences of these disasters remain understudied. Our projects seek to understand the consequences of the historical disasters on regional markets and human capital accumulation.

The first set of projects investigate the potential impacts of the Great Kanto Earthquake in 1923 on the regional markets and children’s health. The second set of projects focus on the long-term effects of fetal and childhood exposure to pandemic infectious diseases (influenza and cholera) and weather shocks (heat and cold waves). We also explore the demographic impacts of considerable decline in male population of Japan following the Second World War.

Our projects utilize panel data analyses with unique multidimensional panel datasets to better identify the potential impacts of the historical disasters.

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Publications


  1. Janet Hunter, Kota Ogasawara.
    Price shocks in regional markets: Japan’s Great Kanto Earthquake of 1923.
    Economic History Review, forthcoming.
  2. Kota Ogasawara.
    Persistence of natural disasters on child health: Evidence from the Great Kanto Earthquake of 1923 arXiv
  3. Kota Ogasawara and Mizuki Komura.
    Consequences of war: Japan’s demographic transition and the marriage market (with M. Komura) SSRN
  4. Kota Ogasawara, Minami Yumitori.
    Early-life exposure to weather shocks and child height: Evidence from industrializing Japan.
    Social Science & Medicine: Population Health 7, 2019.
  5. Kota Ogasawara.
    The long-run effects of pandemic influenza on the development of children from elite backgrounds: Evidence from industrializing Japan.
    Economics & Human Biology 31, 2018, 125-137.
  6. Kota Ogasawara, Tatsuki Inoue.
    Long-run effects of early childhood exposure to cholera on final height: Evidence from industrializing Japan.
    Social Science & Medicine: Population Health 4, 2018, 66-70.
  7. Kota Ogasawara.
    Persistence of pandemic influenza on the development of children: Evidence from industrializing Japan.
    Social Science & Medicine 181, 2017, 43-53.

Funding acknowledgements