Child stunting during industrialization: Critical windows and growth patterns

Abstract


Coping with childhood stunting is an important policy issue in developing countries today. In fact, child stunting because of undernutrition has adverse long-term effects on economic outcomes in adulthood. 

Our projects seek to contribute to this field by investigating unique panel data, recently obtained from official historical statistics of the physical examinations.

The first set of projects estimate the potential long-term effects of early exposures to several types of exogenous shocks such as pandemic influenza, weather shocks, great earthquake, and war. Historical GIS methods are used for obtaining the geospatial distribution data for these shocks, and multidimensional panel data model is utilized for the empirical analysis.

The other projects assess how the disease environment influences children’s growth. We first predict the children’s growth parameters using the SITAR (Superimposition by Translation and Rotation) growth model, and then relate the parameters to the disease environment variables via panel data analysis. These projects are conducted by Professor Eric Schneider at the London School of Economics, and Professor Tim Cole at the University College London, Great Ormond Street Institute of Child Health (ICH).

Social media


  • Disease and child growth in industrialising Japan: Critical windows and the growth pattern, 1917-39 (with Eric Schneider, London School of Economics)
  • Long-run effects of early childhood exposure to cholera on final height: Evidence from industrializing Japan (with Tatsuki Inoue)

Publications


  1. Kota Ogasawara.
    Persistence of natural disasters on child health: Evidence from the Great Kanto Earthquake of 1923 arXiv
  2. Kota Ogasawara, Minami Yumitori.
    Early-life exposure to weather shocks and child height: Evidence from industrializing Japan.
    Social Science & Medicine: Population Health 7, 2019.
  3. Eric Schneider, Kota Ogasawara.
    Disease and child growth in industrialising Japan: Critical windows and the growth pattern, 1917-39.
    Explorations in Economic History 69, 2018, 64-80.
  4. Kota Ogasawara, Tatsuki Inoue.
    Long-run effects of early childhood exposure to cholera on final height: Evidence from industrializing Japan.
    Social Science & Medicine: Population Health 4, 2018, 66-70.
  5. Kota Ogasawara.
    Persistence of pandemic influenza on the development of children: Evidence from industrializing Japan.
    Social Science & Medicine 181, 2017, 43-53.

Funding acknowledgements